There are libraries popping up around the world where you can see the books breathe.  You can watch the books blink, cry, laugh, and think. You can ask them any sort of question and get a real answer.

It’s what the books hope you’ll do.

At the Human Library in Copenhagen in Denmark, the books are people!

It’s set up just like a normal library: You check out a “book” on a certain topic and have an allotted amount of time with it. Only at the Human Library, the book is, well, a human.

People who volunteer to become “books” make their experiences open and available, usually on issues that people tend to have a difficult time discussing. “Readers” are encouraged to ask questions freely, and they’ll get honest answers in return. It’s brilliant.

What kind of books can you borrow there?

 1. Borrow a person with autism.

With 1 in 68 kids diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) today, there’s no better way to learn about it than by interacting with someone who has it.

2. Borrow someone who has modified their appearance.

Ever make assumptions about people with lots of piercings and tattoos? Here’s an opportunity to stop judging a book by its cover and get to know the inside.

3. Borrow a refugee and hear their story.

You’ve heard about the Syrian refugee crisis in the news. Why not put the media on hold and talk to an actual refugee?

4. Borrow someone who is transgender.

Perhaps you’ve always had questions about being transgender but didn’t know how to ask them. Go ahead. Get your questions ready.

5. Borrow a homeless person.

What stories do they have of a life you may never know?

6. Borrow someone with deaf-blindness.

Just because they communicate differently doesn’t mean their stories are less.

7. Borrow someone who is obese.

Society loves to put people in categories. Break through those boundaries to get a fuller picture.

 

The entire article can be found here:  http://www.upworthy.com/check-out-a-human-library-where-you-borrow-people-instead-of-books?g=2&c=upw1

 

And Launceston Public Library in Tasmania has joined the worldwide network of human libraries:  http://www.launceston.tas.gov.au/lcc/index.php?c=641